Tar sands

Posted on September 23, 2014

For the past three months Suncor has been transporting diluted bitumen from the tar sands in northern Alberta to a storage facility at Sorel-Tracy, which is located at the confluence of the Richelieu River and the St. Lawrence River just east of Montreal.

Their plan is to continue to transport oil by rail to this port and to fill 20 to 30 tankers a year that would travel on the St. Lawrence River to export markets.

Posted on July 28, 2014

A new study suggests that naturally occurring upward flow of groundwater in the oilsands region is creating fractures and weaknesses that may explain a series of catastrophic events for the controversial mining industry.

Story Link: 

Posted on July 08, 2014

A new poll released Friday shows the majority of Canadians assume development in the Alberta oilsands has a much larger impact on nation's economy than it actually does.

Story Link: 

Posted on January 23, 2014

Neil Young's support of the Athabaskan Chipewyan's fundraising efforts towards their tarsand court case gained a truckload of press attention last week.  Every national and daily paper reaped the benefits of a hot topic and it ignited a national conversation about energy resources in Canada. I’m grateful for that.

Not just to Neil though. The press seemed to miss that the leaders of the debate are the Athabaskan Chipewyan people and countless other First Nations that are launching court cases to protect our land and drinking water for ALL of us.
Neil was just lending a helping hand.

"Respect existence or expect resistance"

Earlier this week activists converged at PR Springs, site of the first proposed tar sands mine in the United States. They shut down work at the mine, and road construction, for the entire day. Check out the amazing video of the action below, and for more information visit: http://www.peacefuluprising.org/actioncampaction

Posted on June 03, 2013

by Karen Wristen

The impacts unchecked climate change could have on global food security might accurately be described as apocalyptic. As detailed in the most recent assessment by the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change, these include dramatic increases in drought, famine, flooding and disease, as well as equally dramatic losses in biodiversity.

Posted on May 08, 2013

by Joyce Nelson

Canada’s Information Commissioner, Suzanne Legault, agreed at the end of March to launch an investigation into the extensive muzzling of federally-funded scientists at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and other federal agencies. Her decision comes after a February 20th complaint formally filed by Democracy Watch in partnership with the Environmental Law Clinic of the University of Victoria, which called for a full investigation and was accompanied by a 128-page report, Muzzling Civil Servants: A Threat to Democracy.

That report documents systematic silencing since 2007 of

Writing for Island Tides, Elizabeth May discusses the issues around all the pipeline proposals, eastern Canada's reliance on foreign oil, and comes to the only sensible solution -- slow down the expansion of the tar sands to a managable and steady 2 million barrels a day, which would cool inflation, and construct the refineries needed so that Alberta is shipping conventional oil and gas to eastern Canada instead of dilbert. May says this would be thinking like a country.

Sounds like a plan to me.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Tar sands