Pesticides

Posted on November 26, 2014

dead beesThe Ontario government plans to restrict the use of a class of agricultural pesticides linked to the widespread declines in honeybees and other pollinators.

The move is opposed by the province’s chemical and agriculture industries, which say neonicotinoid pesticides are vital tools that growers of corn and soybeans use to protect their harvests from yield-destroying insects.

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Posted on November 26, 2014

The Ontario government announced a plan today to protect bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects from the harmful effects of neonicotinoid, or neonic, pesticides. In a discussion paper posted to the Ontario Environmental Bill of Rights (EBR) registry, the government outlined a strategy to reduce the use of neonic-coated seeds in the province by 80 per cent by 2017.

Posted on November 19, 2014

honey bee collecting pollenA group of doctors and nurses is urging the Ontario government to ban an agricultural pesticide blamed for the deaths of bees and other insect pollinators.

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Posted on November 05, 2014

More than 110,000 people have told Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) not to register flupyradifurone, Bayer's latest bee-killing pesticide.

Over the past three weeks, Sierra Club Canada Foundation, David Suzuki Foundation and SumOfUs.org spearheaded a campaign to inform the public of the opportunity to submit formal comments to the PMRA.

"We shared the facts about flupyradifurone, and the response has been incredible," said Paul Ferris, of SumOfUs.org. “Over 110,000 Canadians sent a clear message to PMRA: Protect the bees.”

Posted on August 28, 2014

Bee on clover flower.Scientists have linked both the collapse of bee populations and the stunning decline in bird and bat numbers to a new generation of insecticides called neonicotinoids. It gets worse: these widely-used nerve poisons are also considered the main cause of a general collapse of insect life since the mid 1990s. Bug-spattered windshields have become rare where they were once common in North America and Europe.

Posted on August 15, 2014

Millvale, PEI, August 11, 2014 – After more than a half-century of toxic assaults on PEI rivers by the potato industry, the perennial response from government to improve regulations is grossly inadequate.

Posted on October 17, 2012

Children are not simply small versions of adults-they can be affected more easily, and more seriously, by pesticides and other contaminants.

In recent years there has been increasing concern about the health effects of exposure to pesticides, especially in children. This is partly due to the mounting toxicological evidence that children's exposures can be more hazardous than adult exposures, and because of the number of health effects in children that can be attributed to pesticide exposure.

Posted on October 17, 2012

Bats don't need pesticides or electricity to kill mosquitoes - they only need a nice place to live.

by J. Cates

Bela Lugosi gave them a bad rep. But bats are good pals. They're a natural, all-purpose insecticide, and incredibly efficient at their job. One of the little critters can eat 500 mosquitos in an hour, and thousands in a single night, and they'll help you clear the air around your home with no chemicals and no electric zappers.

Posted on October 15, 2012

The image of Prince Edward Island as a pastoral paradise is a thing of the past, as agricultural pesticides pollute the rivers of the Maritime province.

by Sharon Labchuk

The carefully constructed image of Prince Edward Island as a pastoral paradise was shattered this summer. Over the course of one month, nine rivers were poisoned by agricultural pesticides. Thousands of fish were found belly-up, and frogs, snakes, worms, slugs and insects were exterminated.

Posted on October 14, 2012

by Paula Linquist

A 1994 BC Ministry of Forests (MoF) Risk Assessment of Gypsy Moth in British Columbia states"... the direct impact of an established gypsy moth population on BC's natural resources would likely be small." Despite this, MoF officials have applied for a Pesticide Use Permit to aerial and ground spray the Burnaby Lake area up to 4 times for gypsy moths. The biocide of choice is a combination of 2.1% live bacteria, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and 97.9% unknown chemicals which are kept hidden by the Trades Secret Act.

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