Economy

Here's a critical piece that is well worth a few minutes to read - a discussion of the current trend in environmentalism to boosting green energy and green tech as THE solution, instead of looking at the longer term implications and searching for real solutions to the human ecological problem.

This interview by Steve Horn, Power Shift Away from Green Illusions, in truthout explores the paradigm.

"Things aren’t as simple as they seem, and "there's actually no such thing as a free lunch" when it comes to energy

To: EAconsultationsEE@international.gc.ca

Dear Sir/Madam,

 This Trade Treaty is a disaster and must be stopped! It must be stopped because of all of the negative impacts on OUR environment and every other aspect of OUR Canadian way of life.

In your "Initial Assessment" of this Treaty you say three things which are highly distressing. Myself and many others are wondering if you had your glasses on when reading this Treaty? They are: 

Posted on October 15, 2012

by Maggie Paquet 1999

Ecotourism has been touted as being the panacea for preserving wilderness, biodiversity, local economies, and indigenous cultures. It is considered by many to be the "non-consumptive" alternative to industrial uses for land whereby communities can develop "sustainable" economies.

Posted on October 15, 2012

Too often, filling up means adding a Toxic Tiger to the gasoline in your tank.

by Delores Broten

The war at the gas pump rages un••• abated, with the oil and gas companies and consumers lined up in unequal battle over gasoline price hikes. Meanwhile, the toxic assaults from benzene, Poly Aromatic Hydrocarbons and other natural components of this fuel so central to current industrialized society continue to wreak havoc.

Posted on October 15, 2012

The "unconventional unidentified" oil that the global economy is counting on has not yet been discovered, and just might not exist.

by David Fleming

I have missed my vocation. I should have been a pick-pocket. I like dipping sneakily into heavy tomes full of small print, and seeing what I come up with. Very occasionally, I find something quite extraordinary.

Posted on October 15, 2012

This looming monster called the World Trade Organization ... Is it really malevolent?

by Mary Boardman

Monster: "... an imaginary entity compounded of incongruous elements; an inhumanly wicked person ..."

Posted on October 14, 2012

Corporations want to divert Canada's rivers south to irrigate a few years of profits.

by Don Malcolm

By 2025 the earth's population will have increased by an additional two billion people. What we do in the next twenty-five years will determine whether we are moving toward civilization or chaos. The first three decades of the 21st century will bring change difficult to imagine by many from to-day's perspective.

Posted on October 14, 2012

Hard times in BC's export economy are fuelling an effort to lift the moratorium on offshore oil and gas development.

by Oonagh O'Connor, Living Oceans Society

The exploration and development of offshore oil and gas have been prohibited on the west coast of Canada for almost 30 years because of the threat they pose to our environment and coastal economy. Now downturns in BC's resource export economy have some people promoting offshore oil and gas.

Posted on October 10, 2012

Our report on last issue's Footprint Quiz tells you how well you're doing.

by Norberto Rodriquez dela Vega

The Ecological Footprint concept was developed at the University of BC by Dr. William Rees and Dr. Mathis Wackernagel in 1995. It is a representation of how much of the Earth's biologically productive land is required to produce the food we consume, the wood to build our houses, to give room for infrastructure (roads, services and installations), and to assimilate our wastes.

Posted on October 10, 2012

These large gas-fired power plants have raised serious concerns among investors and among grass-roots groups for their negative ecological impacts.

by Seth Dunn, Worldwatch Paper 151, July 2000

Anyone who operates digital equipment will wryly agree with the Worldwatch Institute's new report, which argues that today's giant power plants, especially coal and nuclear, are failing to provide the high-quality, reliable electricity needed to power the new digital economy.

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