Alternative Energy

Posted on March 31, 2014

On March 13, 2014, Gerrard Olivotto, a consultant working for the BC government, visited  Sointula, BC to conduct a survey to measure people's reactions to photographs of wind turbines located in various locations and terrains. Mr. Olivotto explained that the information collected will be analyzed and published, and will form the cornerstone of government policy regarding the scale and location of wind energy developments in BC.

Posted on August 24, 2012

BC faces three threats from our use of energy: global warming, and the peaking of oil supplies, and natural gas supplies. BC needs policies that will accelerate investment in sustainable energy technologies, and a road map that will ensure a smooth and just transition to a sustainable energy economy, without a net loss of jobs.

by Guy Dauncey

The BC government should use taxes, subsidies and

Posted on August 17, 2012

by Guy Dauncey

Wind turbines are spinning on the hills of southern Alberta, and on a hill outside Whitehorse, in the Yukon. They are spinning in downtown Toronto, and along the shores of the St Lawrence, in Quebec. But there are no wind turbines spinning in British Columbia — yet. 

The production of electricity from the wind is making rapid progress around the world. By the end of 2003, wind turbines had 39,000 megawatts (MW)

Posted on August 16, 2012

by George Monbiot. Published in the Guardian, November 22, 2004. Reprinted with permission.

If human beings were without sin, we would still live in an imperfect world. Adam Smith’s notion that by pursuing his own interest a man “frequently promotes that of … society more effectually than when he really intends to promote it” and Karl Marx’s picture of a society in which “the free development of each is the condition for the free development of all” are both mocked by one obvious constraint. The world is finite.

Posted on August 16, 2012

Compiled by Delores Broten

The growth in biofuel projects around the world has been
explosive since 2001, but not all biofuels are equal.

In Victoria BC, like many cities, the gases burped out in the landfi ll as materials rot are collected and burned in a fl agship project to make electricity. 

In Ottawa, the wastewater treatment plant puts the sludge through an anaerobic compost system and

Posted on August 14, 2012

While governments diddle around with new nuclear power and the climate crisis threatens to go over the top, you can install alternative energy yourself at home or in your business, probably for less cost than buying a hybrid car. And of course, for the householder as well as the power corporation, the “negawatt” of power saved through energy

Posted on August 11, 2012

When the production of oil fails to meet demand, a scenario known as Peak Oil, what then? World Peak Oil is predicted to occur sometime between 2008 and 2010, though some say it has already happened, and “the event” will be followed by a steady decrease of available energy. This could be a collective opportunity for society to transition to true sustainability.
 

by Norberto Rodriguez dela Vega

Posted on July 20, 2012

by Carol Gray

Quadra Island, at the north end of Georgia Strait between Vancouver Island and the BC mainland, is about to make a name for itself in the field of renewable ocean energy. Campbell River-based Canoe Pass Tidal Energy Corp. has part­nered with Focus Environmental and Calgary-based New Energy Corp. to develop a demonstration tidal-current energy project in Canoe Pass, which runs between Quadra and Maud is­lands near Seymour Narrows.

Posted on July 17, 2012

by David Simms 

If there’s anything that could motivate us to conserve electricity, it wouldn’t be the money we’d save. Electricity’s cheap. If we were to measure the benefits of conservation against the bits of inconvenience required to change habits or to restructure the ways we do things, we’d get a bigger bang for our trouble by doing a host of other things. 

Economists and media almost always present us with a dollar-based, cost-benefit analysis for doing nearly anything. But they could be missing the point. How could they explain the fact that most of us get up more quickly and enthusiastically on a Saturday morning when there’s really very little economic incentive to do

Posted on July 16, 2012

by David Simms

Over the decade that my family and I spent living with a wind­mill to supply all of our electricity, we became acutely aware of exactly how much energy we used. Our appliances gobbled too much power, and many were the times we wished for the magical solutions in household technology that are now available off-the-shelf. In a sense, I now view our experience as a laboratory experiment, the findings of which could be applied to electricity use in the conventional, urban home.

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