Pipelines

Posted on December 19, 2013

Enbrige PipelineDecember 19, 2013

by Susan MacVittie

The Enbridge Pipeline project has been given the green light.

Today the Joint Review Panel for the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Project today recommended that the federal government approve the project, subject to 209 required conditions.

Posted on October 21, 2013

by Susan MacVittie, Web Exclusive
Photo Credit: David Ellis

Kinder Morgan Canada critic, David Ellis, is looking for people who would be interested in walking the Trans Mountain pipeline in the Blue River summit area, north of Thompson River, BC to keep an eye on the condition of the 60 year old pipeline.

“There is little public information as to the number of past and present repairs in this region and this data needs to be publicized. How many exposed pipe sites, and round, red, metal signs, have you seen? These indicate past pipe weaknesses. Keep

Posted on April 18, 2014

With a hushed crowd of about one hundred, the unofficial result of the Kitimat plebiscite was read aloud Saturday evening.  Instantly, those gathered at the downtown park erupted into screams of joy.

Enbridge has lost the vote.

YES     1,278 (41.6%)

NO      1,793 (58.4%)

Total    3,071

Nathan Cullen, NDP MP for Skeena—Bulkley Valley was visibly nervous as the smart phone was read carefully for the announcement.

Story Link: 

Posted on April 12, 2014

A Northern Gateway Open House event enabled many people to ask tough questions about the oil sands pipeline.

Story Link: 

Posted on March 18, 2014

Burnaby Advises National Energy Board that Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project Application is Incomplete and does not meet Legal Requirements for Hearing and Public Evaluation

Posted on March 07, 2014

Washington, DC – On the last day of the public comment period, Keystone XL opponents held a rally in front of the State Department to deliver more than 2 million comments submitted to the State Department to urge Secretary Kerry and President Obama to reject the dirty, dangerous pipeline. The public comment period regarding the national interest of the pipeline began on February 5, after the State Department published the final environmental review.

Posted on February 14, 2014

Kinder Morgan Pipeline Threatens Ecology and Economy of Salish Tribes Tribes on Both Sides of the Border Intervene in Proceeding to Address Tanker Traffic and Oil Spill Risks

 

Seattle, WA & Vancouver, BC, Coast Salish Territories; February 13, 2014

Posted on January 23, 2014

David Suzuki, Ian Hanington, Huffington Post, Jan 22 2014

Debating the best way to do something we shouldn't be doing in the first place is a sure way to end up in the wrong place. That's what's happening with the "rail versus pipeline" discussion. Some say recent rail accidents mean we should build more pipelines to transport fossil fuels. Others argue that leaks, high construction costs, opposition and red tape surrounding pipelines are arguments in favour of using trains.

But the recent spate of rail accidents and pipeline leaks and spills doesn't provide arguments for one or the other; instead, it indicates that rapidly increasing oil and gas development and shipping ever greater amounts, by any method, will mean more accidents, spills, environmental damage -- even death. The answer is to step back from this reckless plunder and consider ways to reduce our fossil fuel use.

If we were to slow down oil sands development, encourage conservation and invest in clean energy technology, we could save money, ecosystems and lives -- and we'd still have valuable fossil fuel resources long into the future, perhaps until we've figured out ways to use them that aren't so wasteful. We wouldn't need to build more pipelines just to sell oil and gas as quickly as possible, mostly to foreign markets. We wouldn't have to send so many unsafe rail tankers through wilderness areas and places people live.

Posted on January 02, 2014

Last June, I spent three days in a Vancouver courtroom  watching the Hupacasath First Nation argue their case against the federal government.
The Hupacasath came robed, just like the judges and the lawyers. They weren’t wigged-out like the Department of Justice benchmen. They wore cedar woven headbands and hummingbird embroidered regalia (and underneath, comfortable blue jeans).

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