Energy

Posted on January 01, 2014

 As you will all remember, TEPCO’s plans for decontaminating the ever increasing amounts of radioactive water accumulating at Fukushima depend upon their ALPS decontamination system. Recently the first hot runs of this system commenced and now a report has been issued in Japanese only on Nov 29.

Posted on April 12, 2014

A Northern Gateway Open House event enabled many people to ask tough questions about the oil sands pipeline.

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Posted on March 11, 2014

Yukon
Community opposition to fracking was spurred by an application submitted by the Chinese company, Northern Cross, in 2010. There is currently no fracking underway in the Yukon, but Northern Cross has been conducting 3D seismic testing. The Council of Yukon First Nations passed a resolution in July 2013 declaring traditional territories “frack-free.” A Standing Committee of the Yukon Legislative Assembly is accepting public comments about fracking, and will report on its findings and recommendations on a policy approach to hydraulic fracturing in the Yukon during the 2014 spring sitting.

Posted on March 11, 2014

Hydraulic fracturing – commonly called fracking – may well become the political issue that polarizes Nova Scotians this year.
The practice has already generated huge controversy elsewhere in Canada, the US and Europe, and now it is raising political concerns both on mainland Nova Scotia and on Cape Breton Island, where industrial contamination and costly remediation are fresh in everyone’s memory.

Posted on January 22, 2014

by Mark Hume, Globe and Mail, Jan 21 2014

VANCOUVER — A former scientist with the Geological Survey of Canada has cast doubt on the B.C. government’s promise of an economic boom from increased liquefied natural gas production.

Posted on January 22, 2014

New Worldwatch Institute report reviews extent of global energy subsidies

Posted on January 18, 2014

The National Energy Board (NEB) has approved seven LNG export applications for BC, totalling 14.6 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d).

  • Meeting these approved exports would require increasing BC’s gas production to nearly 50 per cent more than all of Canada currently produces - within less than a decade.
  • These exports would require more and more gas wells and more and more fracking, up to 50,000 wells over the next 27 years, using up to 10 million gallons of water per well for the fracking.
  • The NEB's job is to protect Canada's energy security, but in its reference case, the NEB projects that Canada will have no more than 4.5 bcf/d of export capacity by 2035 – yet it has approved LNG exports of 14.6 bcf/d starting in 2020.
Posted on January 02, 2014

Piles of dusty petroleum waste called "petcoke"It looks like Armageddon but it’s “just a little bit of Alberta.”

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